Enjoy the Silence

Crater Lake

“Silence is inhabited by countless beings, in forests, lakes, seas, mountains, and underground too – Cosmic Intelligence has placed inhabitants everywhere. Even fire is inhabited, so too is the ether, the sun, the stars – the entire universe is inhabited. So wherever you go, in the mountains, in the forests, by rivers, lakes or oceans, if you want to be like an awakened being, aspiring to a life that is subtler and filled with more light, do not disturb the silence of these places. Show that you are aware of the presence of etheric creatures living there. When you approach them, begin by greeting them; show them your respect, your love, and ask them to give you their blessings. These creatures will catch sight of you from afar and, filled with wonder at your attitude, will come running to shower you with their presents of joy, light, love and pure energy. And you will return home with a much greater idea of what true Life is.”

– Omraam Mikhael Aivanhov

Very few things can prepare you for your first sight of Crater Lake.
It’s not just the unearthly blue of the water, it is also the sheer size of the place. It looks a lot smaller in photos than in real life. The lake itself is about six miles wide and the drive around the rim is about 53 km. Many people hike the rim trail and for most of the year, the lake is inaccessible since it receives almost 12 feet of snow per year and even when I visited in the second week of August, there were still patches of snow at the waterline. If you want to have your breath taken away, forget the Grand Canyon and the tourist circus that place has become and go to Crater Lake instead.
Crater Lake is a lake that was created when Mount Mazama blew its top 7700 years ago. The dome collapsed, forming a caldera and the snow run-off over the years is really where the water comes from. The deepest lake in the US and the seventh deepest lake in the world, the water is ice-cold and very, very pure. Wizard Island, on the western end of the lake was formed from a volcanic cinder cone and geologist say that one day, it will blow again as well.
Some Native American tribes still do vision quests as a rite of passage for young men in that tribe.

Some Native American tribes still do vision quests as a rite of passage for young men in that tribe.

Depending on which tribe you listen to, this place is either cursed or holy.
Local Klamath Indians still come here to do vision quests, which usually involves fasting for a few days under the guidance of an Elder, holding ceremony and then diving into the frigid water to receive the vision. On the other hand, some Klamath Elders and Modoc Elders consider the placed accursed and that to gaze on the waters is to invite death and avoid the place completely. In the past, Natives would deliberately lie to many of the early white explorers and settlers to throw them off from finding the lake and Wizard Island since they consider the place haunted and evil. They believe this because their stories still record when Mount Mazama erupted and apparently the force of the eruption was 42 times stronger than when nearby Mount St. Helen’s blew in 1980, so you can just imagine the devastation. Imagine something along the lines of Mount Vesuvius and what happened to the inhabitants of Pompeii and Herculaneum. I’m sure that kind of destruction leaves an etheric footprint.

Mount St. Helen’s erupting in 1980

Many, many, many stories about the place have developed over the years. UFO sightings are rife and apparently in February 1997, a fighter jet was seen pursuing UFOs over the lake and that evening, a sonic boom was heard throughout Western Oregon. Sasquatch/Bigfoot sightings happen regularly as well and several park rangers claim to have followed a large, dark, foul-smelling creature through the woods until it started throwing pinecones at them somewhere along the Southern Rim Road. Many people have gone missing  over the years and rangers regularly see fires on Wizard Island in the middle of the night to only go investigate and find out no one is there and there was no evidence of any campfire. (Public boating isn’t allowed there, the only way to get to Wizard island is to take the official boat tour which involves a gruelling 1 mile hike down the rim from Cleetwood Cove.)
Even the waters are supposedly haunted. Some people claim to have seen a dragon, serpent-like creature in the water a “block long”.  Until recently, that could be dismissed  as legend and a tall tale. However, in recent years scientists discovered that new life forms have been found in the coldest parts of the ocean, thanks to deep sea vents, volcanic fissures in the ocean which create  just enough pockets of warmth for lifeforms to develop despite the absence of light and despite the cold temperatures of the water. In effect, most biology textbooks had to be re-written when they found that out since it was assumed you needed light for life to exist. And guess what? Crater Lake has deep lake hydrothermal vents since the area is still seismically active and volcanically dormant, not dead.
Picture of a hydrothermal worm which lives on the sea floor.

Picture of an actual hydrothermal worm which lives on the seafloor.

I drove in coming in from the North Entrance, since it far less busier, through the ancient lava field, now an open field with the odd, lonely pine tree standing here and there. It was a hot, humid day and the place was crawling with thousands of tourists.
Skell Head lookout point

Skell Head lookout point

Stopping at various look-out points, scoping it out and getting a feel for the place, the very first thing I noticed while standing on the rim was the immense, almost muffling silence of the place. You can feel the wind against you but you won’t hear it. People can be talking loudly barely 10 feet away from you stand but it somehow sounds muffled. This wasn’t the rich, almost buzzing-like golden silence I experienced in places like Cappadocia, Turkey or Moray, Peru or the soft silence of untouched forests. This was the kind of silence you feel like when you’re being watched. Oppressive and strong.
Crater Lake Lodge and one of the wind-bent trees there

Crater Lake Lodge and one of the wind-bent trees there

I had a vague idea of taking the boat ride tour the next day, out to Wizard Island to offer tobacco.  Online reservations were full, so I headed over to the Crater Lake Lodge, a posh but rustic overpriced hotel to buy my ticket for the next day at an automated teller machine. It turned out there was one, last available ticket. I was about to buy it but then before I could press the “Buy” button, something, a sudden feeling, told me to back off. I didn’t buy the ticket but that night while researching about the lake online and trying to figure out a secluded spot I could go to, I found out about all the bad mojo the lake and area have.  I didn’t feel bad anymore about missing the boat tour.
Glad I missed that boat....

Glad I missed that boat….

The next day I returned. I left the main hiking trail and given that I was in running shoes and not proper hiking boots, I veered away from the edge of the rim trail. There are no guard rails and if you go down, you’re going all the way down since it is insanely steep. I found a meadow, not far from the highest point along the rim,  and went to the center of a grove of Whitebark Pines, pine trees which have grown up deformed because of the strong westerly winter winds here.
A Typical twisted but ancient Whitebark Pine found around Crater Lake.

A typically twisted but ancient Whitebark Pine found around Crater Lake.

I noticed a giant blue jay sitting in the tree but not squawking as they usually do, blue jays are normally very noisy birds. Again, a silence you could cut up into pieces. I lay the tobacco down and did my thing. I’ll only say this; there are some exceptionally powerful beings and entities here. Very powerful.  For anyone who wants to come here to do serious spiritual work, you need to come with an attitude of reverence, respect and humility.  I didn’t see anything but I certainly felt the presence of *something*. When I looked up, there were now 3 giant crested blue jays in that same tree staring down at me. No singing, no chirping just complete silence as they flew off one by one.
What I learned is that even when it comes to good places or bad places, if you respect a place, it will respect you right back. Intention is everything.  Even when we think we’re all alone, in the middle of nowhere, we never really are. Something is always watching over us

 

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Categories: New Energy Centers, Those unseen things, Travels | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

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4 thoughts on “Enjoy the Silence

  1. Great article on Crater Lake! It looks spectacular! Can’t wait to visit myself, one day. 🙂

  2. Pingback: Mountains, Sigils and Blessings | The Shift Has Hit The Fan

  3. Pingback: Kissing the Lie Goodbye | The Shift Has Hit The Fan

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