Posts Tagged With: Nature spirits

Magic in the Neighbourhood

The Brownie Castle, Granby, Quebec

I have mentioned a few times that I grew up in a particularly idyllic part of Canada, in Southern Quebec, an area known as the Eastern Townships, which straddles the border with Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. It is in the Appalachian panhandle, the oldest mountain range on planet Earth, which once upon a time, many ice ages ago, was 7 times higher than the Himalayas.

Lavender farm among the hills of the Eastern Townships.

Lavender farm among the hills of the Eastern Townships.

Today they are mostly gentle, rounded hills, meandering rivers, sleepy villages established by the Loyalists (persons who were in the US but wanted to remain loyal subjects of the British Crown so left and came up to Canada), farms, vineyards producing iced apple cider wine and ski hills.
To me the Townships has always been home, not Montreal.

Lac Boivin, I learned how to ice-skate on this lake as a 4 year old, in the winter when it was frozen over.

Lac Boivin, I learned how to ice-skate on this lake as a 4 year old, in the winter when it was frozen over.

More particularly I grew up in a town called Granby, a small town established by Scottish settlers. Much of the English-speaking population left the Townships in the late-1970s, early 1980s, when the separatist political party, the Parti Quebecois came into power. Today about 50 000 Anglos barely hold on while the area became more French due to draconian language laws (I’m not going to go into the whole Anglo vs French thing in Quebec but its a constant theme living in Quebec. You can read about it here if you want). Even so, if you ever get the chance to visit, the “STOP” signs are still in English. The wide boulevards, which mark English town-planning are still there. Drive around even more and there are little villages and hamlets with names like Mystic, Aberdeen, East Angus and Waterloo.

In Granby, I grew up practically on the doorstep of the mysterious Brownie Castle, a strange mansion with a hexagonal tower built by the Walt Disney of the Victorian age, Palmer Cox.

Palmer Cox, back in the day.

Palmer Cox, back in the day.

Funny how you can live somewhere for years and never really know the history and more particularly, the esoteric history of that place. I only found all this out in late August but Palmer Cox was a very well-known illustrator in the late 19th century, who grew up in tiny Granby and worked for years in places like New York City and San Francisco. His illustrations were in publications like The New Yorker and Harper’s. And then he created, The Brownies.

brownies-their-book-by-palmer-cox

The Brownies were based on the stories he grew up with from his Scottish heritage, particularly his mother who was from the Highlands. In Scottish folklore, the Brownies were tiny spirits who helped people out in the home. You walk out of a room and come back 5 minutes later and suddenly the floors are mopped or the bed has been made mysteriously. Cox wrote many books about them which were a fantastic hit with kids the world over, not unlike the Harry Potter phenomena.

The Eastman Kodak company using the Brownies for an ad.

The Eastman Kodak company using the Brownies for an ad.

The Brownie images were used to promote dozens of products like soaps and shoe shine polish. In many ways, it was the precursor of what we see the Disney corporation do these days with their animated characters. Cox made millions from it, lived in Europe for years and then for some reason, decided to come back to sleepy little Granby to build the Brownie castle.

And with the Brownie mansion in the background, shortly after it was constructed.

And with the Brownie Castle in the background, shortly after it was constructed.

The Brownie mansion sits in my old neighbourhood.

Across the street from the mansion is the oldest park in Granby, Victoria Park (named after the queen at the time) designed by Frederick Todd, who went on to design Canada’s Parliament Hill in Ottawa, the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City and… Fort Tyron Park in New York City (with Frederick Olmsted Jr.).

The stream heading off into the pool, Victoria Park 1945. It still pretty much looks the same.

The stream heading off into the pool, Victoria Park 1945. It still pretty much looks the same.

I practically grew up in that park, walked through it everyday on my way to school, played with my friends among the rocks and streams and even as a kid, I felt there was something special there.

The Japanese Cedars, they can live for hundreds of years. Many temples and shrines in Japan have groves of these trees.

The Japanese Red Cedars, they can live for hundreds of years. Many temples and shrines in Japan have groves of these trees.

In the fountains, in the grove of ancient Japanese Red Cedars, in the ponds and the exposed giant granite rocks, a hallmark of Olmsted and Todd park design, which I found out in my recent NYC trip. Even now, whenever I return to visit, I always catch someone doing something spiritual there. I’ve seen people meditating, I’ve seen people doing Tai-Chi or yoga. I’m not the only one who can feel *something* is at work in that park. There’s some good mojo in that whole area.

Before going to New York, I went back to Granby to look at the Brownie Castle again (today, it is a private residence with three different apartments, I’m not sure the tenants even know or care about the significance of the building) and to visit Palmer Cox’s grave at the Cowie Street cemetery.

Plaque on Cox's grave.

Plaque on Cox’s grave.

I couldn’t figure out why on Earth would Cox come back to tiny Granby after hitting the jackpot and living in glamorous places like NYC and Europe for decades to build a whimsical mansion in the middle of nowhere ? (The park and neighbourhood were developed decades after the mansion was built.)

Cox, was a Freemason, which also has its own set of esoteric teachings, much of it is a mish-mash of proto-ancient Egyptian and Hermetic teachings and rituals, so he was savvy to these things. Frederick Todd, another Scotsman, was also a Mason (in fact a guy I once knew who was thinking of becoming a Mason even told me that the layout of Parliament Hill is based on the layout of the inside of a Masonic Lodge).
It makes me wonder if Cox felt the energy of that area, the benevolent presence of something and felt compelled to return the favour?

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Categories: Pop culture, Those unseen things, Travels | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Allies

View from top of Mount Constitution on a sunnier day than when I went.

View from top of Mount Constitution on far sunnier day than when I went.

“Even peaks that are not especially high but are prominent and isolated often have an angel in charge. For instance I observed one at Mt. Constitution in the San Juan Islands in Washington. This appears to be the highest point of land on an island which is fairly central in the group, and from its top there is a magnificent view over hundreds of islands on all sides…The angel in charge is one of special power, remarkable in proportion to the peak. He is the guardian of all the islands and makes this point his main center; he has saturated it with his special atmosphere. He has both power and dignity and is of a steady, slow temperament, but especially marked by kindliness and wisdom.  He takes a remarkable interest in human beings and has, indeed, a real fondness for them.  He seems to have a certain scheme which he is working out. He wants to maintain a special atmosphere throughout the islands and this influences his fairies.  It also makes them friendly and helpful to humanity, for this is his wish.  He has also established a feeling that there shall be no barriers.  He has had a wonderful piece of good fortune because a state part (Moran State Park) has been established in such a form as to take in his particular peak and a large area around it.  This is an animal sanctuary in which there are many deer and other fine wild things and magnificent trees…I also think he has managed to impress many of his ideas on the human beings in and about the peak, for his genuine friendliness towards people enables him to understand and guide them…High up on the mountain are several lakes and these are the home of particularly fine specimens of the freshwater fairies…What is remarkable about this place is that it is not only a sanctuary for animals but also a resort for fairies and even angels from the islands and the mainland. The peculiarly lovely combination of sea and mountain and lakes and forest preserve, protects and creates a splendid place, and the powerful personality of the angel draws these beings. They come for counsel and change…He always makes a special effort to help human beings who come to the mountain, and I think many people feel his benign presence even if they do not know of his existence. The magnificent expanse of sea and sky, the distant mainland and snow peaks far off key up the sensitive visitor so that he has a better than usual chance to respond to the presence of this most ancient, wise and stimulating inhabitant.”

Dora Van Gelder
“The Real World of Fairies, A First Person Account”

OrcasIslandWA
Orcas Island is the largest of the San Juan Islands off the coast of Washington State and straddles the US/Canada border. It is full of VERY wealthy Washingtonians, not surprising since both Microsoft and Boeing are both based in Seattle. Practically everyone here drives a Land Rover. Get out of the villages and head into the woods and it’s all moss-covered giant Douglas fir trees, quiet private coves, and secret meadows. And then there’s the intense and sudden fog which comes off the sea and shrouds everything in minutes. One minute you can see the next island and the next you can’t see anything past 5 feet.

Taking the ferry ride over from Anacortes, I saw a few Orca whales. I thought it was strange that practically every time I went near the ocean water, I was seeing a whale while other people pay upwards of $85 an hour on whale watching boat tours with no guarantee of seeing anything.  I guess the gift of Whale medicine was real.

Moran State Park entrance.

Moran State Park entrance.

I went to Moran State Park and drove up to the top, to the observation tower. I couldn’t see anything because of the intense fog that was there. From where I stood, it was like looking out over a cloud field, like what you see when you look out the window of an airplane. The fog can linger for hours.

The lookout tower at the very top.

The lookout tower at the very top.

When I got to the tower at the summit, as expected the place was chock-full of with tourists and hikers, not a place to do any sort of work. Since Van Gelder mentioned the lakes near the top, in her book, I figured I might as well go there and may be it would be much more quiet and private. She said it was near the top. In actuality, it is a steep hike which lasts about 2 km. It looks like nothing on paper, but it’s quite a difficult hike, especially returning uphill. It took me 45 minutes to go down and 2 hours to get back up.

moran map

The forest is indeed beautiful; giant Douglas firs, huge old-growth forest trees, lovely moss everywhere. As you can see from the map, there are three lakes near the top, Mountain Lake, and 2 smaller lakes which are only separated by a tiny sliver of land which are called the Twin Lakes, so I went there since I liked the name and they were closer.

Signage

There were a few hikers on the trail but everyone was far apart that you could forget about them. I wasn’t sure where to go so I decided to hike along the edge of the two lakes and see if something interesting came up. So I went along the edge of one lake and eventually found a beautiful mossy slope going up. I looked up and saw that there was a path there and even further up, someone had made a rock cairn, not at all obvious from the main trail.

Not the rock cairns I saw...

Not the rock cairns I saw…

I scrambled up the trail and soon found myself in a mossy, flat glen, with a clearing in the middle, completely encircled by the trees. There was even a rocky knoll jutting out at the head of the glen, everything, the rocks, the trees and the forest floor were all covered with the thickest, softest moss imaginable. It almost looked like a raised daïs with a throne and I figured with the perfect circle of trees and the clearing, and the privacy and intense quiet and the throne-like rock structure, this was as good as it was going to get. “Bingo” I thought to myself. I took off my shoes. Again intense quiet here, not like Crater Lake which felt muffled, probably because of the altitude, but this forest was like something right out of Narnia, it felt so alive and quietly vibrant.

Digory Kirke in the Wood Between the Worlds, in C.S Lewis' "The Magician's Nephew

Digory Kirke and Polly Plummer in the Wood Between the Worlds, in C.S Lewis’ “The Magician’s Nephew, illustrated by Pauline Baynes

There’s a part in C.S Lewis’s Narnia book, “The Magicians Nephew” where Digory Kirke and Polly Plummer were in a place called the “Wood between the Worlds”, a quiet, lush forest where you could actually feel things were growing.

The trees grew close together and were so leafy that he could get no glimpse of the sky. All the light was green light that came through the leaves: but there must have been a very strong sun overhead, for this green light was bright and warm. It was the quietest wood you could possibly imagine. There were no birds, no insects, no animals and no wind. You could almost feel the trees growing…You could almost feel the trees drinking up the water with their roots. This wood was very much alive. When he tried to describe it afterwards, Digory always said. It was a rich place: as *rich* as plum-cake.”

The feeling was very similar to that. I lay down the tobacco and stayed for about an hour. I then headed back to the main trail to complete the rest of trail around the Twin Lakes and then back up to the tower.

Trail back to the top

Trail back to the top…

About halfway up the mountain. I heard some branches breaking. I looked behind me and saw that it was a lovely doe on the trail, maybe 20 feet away. She wasn’t afraid or anything. We looked at each other for a few seconds and then she pranced off. The next day as I left the island on the ferry, I had my third encounter with a whale, another Orca.

A lot of things came to me after I processed the trip and the various places I visited. My usual readers already know that David Icke’s name comes up regularly here. Really, he’s in essence taking a very old idea and putting it into more modern terms. You don’t have to believe everything you read or what others say. There are plenty of resources to look up and then make up your own minds.

However, if in some way our reality/matrix  has been hijacked by something evil; inter-dimensionals, bad spirits, demons, jinns, reptilians, whatever you want to call it, and if they have had a direct hand in creating these artificial hierarchical systems of control, manufactured scarcity, unnecessary depletion and pollution of this planet’s resources and the uglification of every square foot of earth they can get, then it is not hard to see that it is a true death cult. It hardly leaves any room for real beauty, peace and grace. At this rate, there will be no need to go to Mars.  It will be  re-created right here.

A typical 'industrial park" building. The kind of place many people work in . A dead zone if you ask me...

A typical ‘industrial park” building. The kind of place many people work in . A dead zone if you ask me…

People and places aren’t always what they seem and sometimes you wonder if there’s any integrity left among some human beings. They might have been successful in manipulating many under their influence, but they forgot one crucial point;  they completely overlooked the natural world. The animals, plants, trees, the stars, the Sun, the water, the wind, and the land operate on a completely different frequency which they can’t control, understand or tune into. On the other hand, we can if we really wanted to. That’s our advantage. It also explains why they are hell-bent on destroying any vestige of these other forms of intelligence and consciousness using some people to do their dirty work (they are even trying to make apps for apes now!). Once you decide to enter into a relationship with the natural world, it transforms your outlook and interactions completely. You begin seeing things you didn’t before, it starts heightening your senses, you start understanding more. You don’t have to believe me; scientists are pretty much saying the same thing.


One thing about Native/shamanic teachings and Gnostic teachings, they acknowledge that conscious life can exist in many, many different forms and give them due respect as equals. It’s what they’ve been trying to teach most humans to understand while other formal “religions” (or any other  constructed “ism”) have been trying to do their best to destroy these teachings and eradicate this information from getting into the hands of most people.

Edmund Bordeux Szekely, big time Essene scholar and researcher.

Edmund Bordeaux Szekely, big time Essene scholar and researcher.

Seneca Hawk Elder, Grandmother Edna Gordon ended her earth walk last year at the advanced age of 93 but before she did, she published a book, “Voice of the Hawk Elder” which is mainly comprised of her sayings, thoughts, opinions and the kind of old-fashioned homespun wisdom you just don’t see anymore. She said we’re living in a Popcorn-Potato Chip kind of world.

“It’s a Popcorn-Potato Chip world we’re living in today. We got fast food for the stomach and fast food for the soul. Maybe don’t nourish you, but it’s quick and it’s easy. Bet you never ate the REAL potato salad like we made in those days. Oh, my, it was the world’s best meal by itself! Nobody can seem to make that REAL potato salad today. Today’s kids think potatoes come instant or in chips in plastic bags or all greasy french fried like McDonald’s or Burger King. They think corn comes popped with imitation butter on it, already salted! That’s why I say it’s become a popcorn-potatochip world.
It ain’t real. It’s all imitation.”

She’s right.

It’s a reasonable facsimile of the haze most people operate under everyday and take for reality. I’d go even further and say many people have forgotten what real life and real consciousness is supposed to look like.
If you’ve got an hour to spare, give her a listen. There are some genuine golden nuggets of wisdom here for those who really want to hear. And you don’t have to travel all the way to the Pacific Northwest to get it either 🙂

(P.S Gregg Prescott, copying isn’t cool and I really don’t appreciate the fact that you did in this article and then tried fobbing it off as information you yourself know. You cited Christopher Penczak at the bottom. Penczak is firmly in the Pagan Wicca world – nothing there about Native American spiritual stuff while you suddenly mention it which you’ve never touched before on your website. Do you actually do any spiritual work at all or do you just fleece information from those of us who actually go out there and are trying to figure this stuff out on our own? Shame on you.)

 

Categories: Ascension, Ch-ch-ch-changes, Conspirio, New Energy Centers, Raise your EQ, Those unseen things, Travels | Tags: , , , , , , | 12 Comments

A White Wizard, a Seeress and the Nature Spirits they played with

Benjamin Hoff, is the author of the much-celebrated “Tao of Pooh” and the accompanying “Te of Piglet”, books which, against every publisher’s expectation and next to no marketing or promotion, became sensations in the publishing industry, bringing the basic principles of Taoism via “Winnie the Pooh “into the mainstream. Even today, both books continue to sell well nearly 30 years after they came out. Practically every person I’ve ever visited who was even remotely interested in spirituality or religion has at least the “Tao of Pooh” sitting on their self. Copies are found easily in the second-hand bookstore networks and are often grabbed up quickly.
 
Hoff wrote another, less well-known but equally fascinating book called “The Singing Creek, Where the Willows Grow” a biography of the enigmatic Opal Whitely. Much has been written and discussed about Whitely, a child prodigy naturalist who has been described as a genius or a fraud, depending on what side of the fence you sit on.  The controversy around Whitely sits around her book, “The Fairyland Around Us” where Whitely basically was able to communicate with Nature and nature spirits directly and she described these interactions in detail.
  
Opal led a very unconventional life, being able to memorize huge tracts of writing on plants and animals and grew up to be a charismatic lecturer and speaker on the natural world. She was in demand everywhere she went. She even spent time in India as the guest of the Maharaja of Udaipur. Suffering a head injury during the London bombings during World War II, Opal eventually was committed to the Napsbury Psychiatric Hospital where she died penniless and nearly forgotten in 1992. She is buried at Highgate Cemetery and her gravestone reads, “I spake as a child.” Nowadays, there are online memorials, a 2009 film, YouTube videos of tours through her stomping grounds in the Oregon wilderness, and even a hiking trail and bike path which follows the sites where some of the events in her books took place.

Opal Whitely as a young woman

Personally, after reading “The Singing Creek”, my own impression is that the diary is true. Diverse cultures around the world attest to the existence of nature spirits, whether they are called devas in India, the Little People among Native tribes, the Fairies of the Celtic world, the Sidhe of Scotland or the Djinn of the Islamic faith. There are books and volumes written on their characteristics, their organization, their different classes, (gnomes, sylphs, salamanders, spirits of air etc.), their areas of habitation, their manners and so on.

“Twilight Fantasy” By Edward Robert Hughes

“Midsummer Eve” by Edward Robert Hughes

My own thinking follows this: if we believe in a multi-dimensional world and we now know scientists have proven that up to 14 dimensions exist mathematically in theory (we just don’t experience all of them), then what is there to say that just because we can’t quantify something with our crude instruments (which are based on 4 dimensional mathematics and physics), that it doesn’t exist in a dimension we can neither quantify nor record in….yet? I also have to admit a small part of me would love these things to be true since I still have a fondness for fairy tales and I think, a belief in these beings helps to reinforce a worldview which is open, innocent, fluid and still full of wonder.

The Scottish mathematician and scientist Robert Ogilvie Crombie (1899-1975), better known as Roc, led a life of scientific inquiry until illness forced him out of a career in academia.  Roc is probably best known as one of the founders of the Findhorn Foundation, an intentional community and eco-village in northern Scotland. He was the elderly Scottish gentleman who claimed he spoke with nature spirits.  As a scientist, hermetic magician, and a researcher of the psychic realms, he was in many ways a key figure in the history of esotericism (white magic) in the twentieth century. He is not as famous as his darker counterparts like Aleister Crowley because he worked in solitude and privacy. He did not write books or manuals and he did not take students or attempt to found a group or an esoteric school. Imagine a modern-day Gandalf wearing tweeds and corduroy, walking through the Scottish Highlands with his walking stick. His friend, David Spangler had this to say about him:“Roc was a loving and gentle man, a wondrous story-teller, a musician, and an embodiment of the best of Scottish charm. He was the wise old man, the grandfatherly figure children adore and the magician who guides heroes and heroines on their paths to accomplishment. He was a man of culture who had one foot in this world and one foot in the world of spirits and mystery”

ROC, from the Findhorn page

At the age of 63 according to his book “The Gentleman and the Faun” (which is a delightful read incidentally), Roc had an encounter with Pan, the nature spirit of old Greek mythology at the Edinburgh Botanical Gardens. The book chronicles how Pan and the nature spirits went on to teach Roc about ley lines, power spots in the British Isles, both known (Isle of Iona) and unknown (The Falls of Rogie) which affect the natural balance of forces in this world and how man’s relationship to nature is of paramount importance.  

Robert Ogilvie Crombie

Pan explained that the reason why fewer and fewer people actually see or experience either the sight or presence of Nature spirits now is that they have simply retreated and are in deep anger towards mankind for what we’ve done to their world with all our man-made pollution, subdivisions, landfills, logging, deforestation, oil spills and mining (can’t say I blame them). That mankind needs to rebuild that trust by respecting nature again instead of exploiting it and needs to reverse the hierarchy of Man over Nature to Nature over Man.

Because of his involvement in the founding of the Findhorn community, he was also briefly highlighted in Louis Malle’s film “My Dinner with Andre” (from 3:38 onwards in the clip). Findhorn is especially known for their gardens, in a sandy, rocky and cold pocket of Scotland. They were able to produce vegetables and fruits in large sizes and quantities which normally should never grow in such a climate but did because the Findhorn community took their gardening and planting directions from the devas, the nature spirits themselves.
Roc wrote that Pan told him that the nature spirits are responsible for whether a plant produces something or not, that if the spirit was ill or angry, the plant it was attached to  would not thrive and fail to produce anything.
 (It’s enough to make you look at your trees, garden and houseplants in a completely different way….)
I’ll leave the last word to Roc….
“To anyone who may have expressed a wish to see and talk to nature spirits, whether or not they dropped a penny into a wishing well, remember it took sixty three years for my wish to be granted – so don’t lose hope.”
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Categories: Ascension, Those unseen things | Tags: , , , , , | 6 Comments

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