Posts Tagged With: travels

Mountains, Sigils and Blessings

View of Neahkahnie Mountain and parts of Nehalem Bay from the hamlet of Wheeler, OR

View of Neahkahnie Mountain and parts of Nehalem Bay from the hamlet of Wheeler, OR

“When we see high mountain peaks from a great distance, we instinctively sense that mountains represent a link between earth and heaven, both physically, of course, and even more so spiritually. A great wisdom presided at the formation of the mountains, and where they are situated is never due to chance. Each one is assigned a definite function, which is why they all differ in shape, mass and height. Their peaks rise up like antennae intended for emitting and picking up waves of different frequencies. Each peak therefore creates particular conditions, which can support the activity of our soul and our spirit. And we all have inner mountains we need to climb if we are to communicate with heaven. This is why, for our spiritual life, it is so important that we understand the significance of the word ‘peak’ or ‘summit’.
If you want to get results on a spiritual level you have to climb up to the top of the mountain. The mountain I am referring to is your own mountain, your own casual body. You have to scale the heights of your casual body in order to rise above the mist and dust. ‘Mist’, ‘dust’ and ‘mountain’ are of course all symbols. Dust is that which clouds the mind when it has lingered on too many different paths, and mist is produced by the humidity of the heart when it is exaggeratedly emotional and sentimental and it too prevents you from seeing clearly. In order to escape from the dust of the mind and the mists of the heart, we have to rise above the astral and mental planes and reach the casual plane. This is why, in your meditations and prayers, you should always try to rise, to rise very high, as high as possible. In fact, why not use your imagination and picture yourself scaling a mountain? The picture in your mind will lead you to another mountain, the one inside you, and when you reach the top, the casual plane, you will find so many more ways open to you for the realization of your spiritual thoughts and desires. In the Kabbala, God is called the Most High because symbolically, power and omniscience are to be found on the higher planes.”

– Omraam Mikhael Aivanhov

 

Alright folks, I’m back from holiday.
I did not expect this to happen but I returned to the Pacific Northwest and specifically the Oregon Coast and Mount Shasta, California. But it turns out the mountains there were calling me and dropping sizeable hints and cosmic breadcrumbs even in Montreal and so, like Mohammed, if the mountain can’t come to you, you go to it.
Last year I briefly visited Neahkahnie Mountain and did Crater Lake and Orcas Island. This year I hiked and climbed Neahkahnie to the top. Ditto Humbug Mountain and ditto Mount Shasta. However, before I go into describing these places, their symbolic significance and what came to me afterwards, I need to back up quite a bit.

For those of you who have been reading my blog for a while, you already know that music, namely 1980s British alternative, underground, “college radio” music and music scene from the 1980s played a pretty huge part of my teen years and it’s still a musical genre I consider my favourite. Besides the clubs, the fashion, the music, it really kind of moulded my outlook on a lot of things, appreciating and preferring the little-known, the marginal and the obscure over the mainstream.

The Smiths back in 1985. This reunion will never happen.

The Smiths back in 1985. This reunion will never happen.

Some, like the guys from Depeche Mode, Morrissey of The Smiths, Robert Smith of the The Cure and Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails (NiN) fame have aged and transitioned well from that era and are still regarded as highly influential and highly regarded musicians. I mean Trent Reznor won an Oscar for scoring the film “The Social Network” a few years ago. I still remember seeing him in NiN in 1989 as the opening act for Peter Murphy when no one knew who NiN were! Unfortunately, many others haven’t. I always kind of keep a tab on some of these artists since I still have such warm, fuzzy feelings for them.

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One of my favourite bands, bar-none, from that era are the Godfathers of Goth, Bauhaus and by extension, Love & Rockets. Bass player, David J. Haskins recently wrote a book called “Who Killed Mister Moonlight? Bauhaus, Black Magick and Benediction”. If you’re a music industry junkie, you’ll love this book, everyone makes an appearance from David Bowie, Catherine Deneuve, William S. Burroughs, Iggy Pop, Ian Curtis and Joy Division, Rick Ruben, Chris Martin of Coldplay, Perry Farrell of Jane’s Addiction and Lolapalooza and tons more. It’s not the name-dropping which particularly impressed me. David J. is a fantastic writer but in the tradition of many British musical artists, he also seems to have an interest in the supernatural and the occult, not unlike Jimmy Page or Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin fame. There are some incidents in the book which I don’t recommend reading at night if you get scared easily but it was Chapter Six, entitled, “Sigils” which particularly caught my attention.

“…Among those in the pile was a copy of V.Vales’s Research #4/5, which featured interesting articles and interviews with (William S.) Burroughs, Brion Gysin, and Genesis P. Orridge…In one of these articles, Genesis talks about sigils – an occult technique whereby one writes down a desire in very simple direct language. Any letters that are repeated are used to form a symbol that represents that desire. The sigil is then “charged” by concentrating on it and visualizing it as glowing brighter and brighter while focusing one’s will on the intention and sending it out into the universe. The original is then burnt, and it is then necessary to forget all about it. I decided to give it a shot.”

There are many websites and Youtube videos on how to create sigils and such, should anyone be interested, but it got me thinking that a lot of the prison-like reality many people live in, is controlled by symbols and corporate sigils of someone else’s making.

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Logo for Procter and Gamble. This is a corporate sigil, whether you realize it or not.

Think about logos or brands for instance. Are they not forms of sigils many of us don’t want nor care for? I figure if they can do it, why can’t we also play the same game and beat them to it by creating sigils of our own which benefit everyone? (I should note here; if you are going to work with sigils, a reminder that anything you ask for, for yourself only unfortunately falls under black magick since it comes under ego, white magick is based on altruism, when you ask for something with benefits everyone, no exceptions. Intention counts for everything here.)  As soon as I finished reading the book, that’s when the signs really started coming in that I needed to go to Oregon and California and specifically those three aforementioned mountains. So I went.

Neahkahnie Mountain
Nehalem Bay and the surrounding area is probably one of the most picturesque and pleasant areas along the mystical Oregon coast and rife with stories and legends. Nehalem Bay comprises the small villages of Manzanita, Nehalem and Wheeler and Neahkahnie Mountain dominates the skyline of this area.

 

View from top of Neahkahnie Mountain. The seaside village of Manzanita along the shore, Nehalem Bay in the back and Wheeler on the opposite shore of the Bay.

View from top of Neahkahnie Mountain. The seaside village of Manzanita along the shore, Nehalem Bay in the back and Wheeler on the opposite shore of the Bay.

With the pounding ocean, beaches and the mountain on one side, you have the river which feeds into a protected bay, a gorgeous valley and even more mountains surrounding on the other side. Wheeler is the home of the “Wheeler Moment” , a strange phenomena where synchronicities take place regularly in the area. Neahkahnie Mountain itself is considered an auspicious place by Native American tribes, a place where “the Good Spirit abides”. The last time I came, I offered tobacco to the mountain. This time I was asked to climb it. Suffice to say, that it is NOT an easy hike, unless hiking is already a huge part of your life, it’s a good 4 km hike from the base along the Oregon Coastal Trail to the top. I eventually got there, offered tobacco and worked with the sigils and then hiked back down.

The Old Wheeler Hotel

The Old Wheeler Hotel

The next day, I woke up after having the most pleasant dreams I’ve had in quite a while, the kind that finding you smiling when you wake up. I stayed in a magical, somewhat haunted B & B called the Old Wheeler Hotel and had a view of the mountain from my room. There is no doubt in my mind that whole area between Route 53 and Highway 101, and Nehalem Bay itself has a giant energy vortex there, a very pure and positive one which hardly anyone seems to know about. It’s not a coincidence that there’s even a place nearby called God’s Valley. (Go now before the New Age freaks take over!)

A day later I found myself in Cape Lookout State Park. When I asked one of the park rangers if the whales were migrating at the time, (Cape Lookout is a very good place for whale watching), he mentioned there were some the week before but no one had seen anything recently. I found myself in a remote part of the beach and asked for a sign of validation if what I did was right. The second I asked, the whales appeared, water spouts and fins and all, four of them.

Next stop: Humbug Mountain and Mount Shasta

Categories: Ascension, New Energy Centers, Those unseen things, Travels | Tags: , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Language of Nature

“The Danish writer, J. Anker Larsen, in his novel “The Philosopher’s Stone”, speaks of the contacts that humans can have with nature.  He speaks of the “open world” and the “closed world”, explaining how nature opens up to sensitive, innocent people, particularly to children, whereas it stays closed to the majority, who have not learned to receive the vibratory energies of the subtle world: trees, lakes, rivers and mountains are nothing more than lifeless landscapes, and they have no communication with them.  Those, however, who live in the open world feel not only that they are part of nature but that all of nature is part of them. So when they touch a rock, a tree, an animal or any other creature, they are aware that they live in this rock, tree, animal or creature, that they are part of the soul and being of everything. In order to speak to animals, plants and stones and be understood by them, we must know where to find the entity governing the realm they belong to. The entity which rules over the animal kingdom is found on the astral plane of the universe; the one ruling the plant kingdom in found on the mental plane; the one in charge of the mineral kingdom is on the causal plane, which is so far away that stones to us appear lifeless. However stones are alive; they are alive and conscious….All the time, wherever we are, we can be in contact with all living beings. The language does not matter, because thoughts (and even more so words) produce waves of energy which influence all creation. Those who have worked for a long time at controlling their inner lives will be able to possess the power of the Word. Their purified and illumined lives release a power which permits them to take the etheric double of a tree, a flower, a rock or a spring and use it to serve the world. Yes, for example, they can speak to a rock and ask it to go to the aid of someone fragile, to make that person more stable and stronger, like the rock. They can also go to a spring and ask it to purify and bring new life to their friends… Nature spirits are waiting for you to ask for their help and protection. If you are unaware of them, what can they do? I am sure some of you are thinking as you listen to me, ” What on Earth is he telling us? We are living in a scientific and technological century and he wants us to believe  that we can be in touch with elemental spirits and that they will help us!”  Well, well, well, let me tell you that I believe it. The examples are numerous and the methods are for you to choose.”

– Omraam Mikhael Aivanhov
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My favorite kind of vacation is the kind where I can throw my tent, sleeping bag and foam pad into a giant backpack, fly to a particular destination, pick up a car rental at the airport, throw everything into the car trunk and then hit the road ASAP. I figure when you’re you’re young and able-bodied, that’s the time to do the trips which can be physically demanding, like hiking the Grand Canyon, investigating remote valleys in Cappadocia, or hacking my way through overgrown bush to get to a remote historical site. Art galleries in Florence or palaces in St. Petersburg are not going anywhere, I figure I can see those when I’m old.
Aivanhov’s quote above is in line with the teachings I received when I spent time with First Nations wisdom keepers and Elders. That there is life behind all of creation even if we don’t always see it or understand it. In fact, when you do a sweat lodge and the heated rocks are brought in, they are referred to as Grandfathers and Grandmothers and a certain respect is also given to them.
So it was after receiving the sign from my stay at the Aivanhov retreat that I found myself on a flight to Seattle in order to investigate a few places in the Pacific Northwest. Camping along the way in state parks, driving back roads over remote mountains, ducking into motels when it became too cold, eating at diners or splurging on seafood feasts thanks to Oregon’s 350 mile wild seacoast, for years the area had been beckoning me and I finally made it there.
A few things sparked my interest about that part of the United States. After having visited New Age circuses like Sedona, Mount Shasta and California in general, I’m always on the lookout for those forgotten and overlooked magical spaces which have escaped the blight of commercialism and mainstream attention. I figured since I was going to be in Oregon, it would also give me a chance to visit Crater Lake and Orcas Island which I will write about in the next few days and weeks.
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Still a big deal in the Pacific Northwest

Aside from Sasquatch/Bigfoot sightings which people still report, it was reading about the “Wheeler Moment” which happens regularly in the Nehalem Bay, an almost regular occurrence of synchronicity the people in the area seem to experience almost daily and how locals always tell people who visit here “to make a wish” particularly in sight of Neahkahnie Mountain. It is a mountain which Native tribes consider to be holy and  “the place of the Supreme deity” in their language. After doing some research, it seems there is a portal or vortex there, an extremely powerful and pure one which some local spiritualists work with as well. Another strange coincidence:  Robert M. Pirsig, the writer of the classic “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” has a teacher who also lives near the base of Neahkahnie Mountain. Practically everyone who visits the area or the closest village, Manzanita, seems to come away with some insight.
Nothing will prepare you for the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest. It literally is like stepping into some primeval world straight out of a J.R.R Tolkien book. Shades of green that you can’t imagine, crystal-like waterfalls everywhere, canopied forests and lush ferns and wild mushrooms abound. Then there is the moss, which starts to cover tree trunks, drapes from the trees, covers rocks, bridges and the forest floor.
The sense of vitality and of the abundance of the life force  is almost overwhelming. The moss was so soft that I could hike barefoot on some trails. The only sad part was seeing how much of Oregon’s wilderness has been sacrificed to logging companies. One minute you’re driving through a fairy tale scene, the next you’re in some desolate post-Apocalyptic landscape.
Multnomah Falls, on the Columbia River Gorge scenic Highway, not far at all from Portland

I tried swimming in the water pool, the water is freezing cold.

Neahkahnie Mountain
Manzanita Beach with Neahkahnie Mountain in the background

Manzanita Beach with Neahkahnie Mountain in the background

Aside from the Wheeler Moment, Neahkahnie seems to be shrouded in mystery and stories of pirate treasure still keeps people coming. A rock formation called the Indian Maiden guards the base of the mountain and whales are usually spotted from the lookout point.
Indian Maiden Rock

Indian Maiden Rock

Neahkahnie Mountain dominates the skyline of Nehalem Bay, which includes the villages of Manzanita, Wheeler and Nehalem. It’s a small community comprised mostly of fisherman and given the abundance of seafood which is harvested from the bay, it’s easy to see why. I made my way to Neahkahnie Mountain, offered tobacco like I always do when I visit a holy place, and spent an amazing afternoon meditating on Manzanita Beach. I’m not going to share what I meditated on and what came to me only to say that I got my insights a bit later on after the trip and the experiences at Crater Lake and Orcas Island are also taken into consideration. The next day I stopped off in Wheeler to investigate a bit more while on my way to Cape Lookout State Park. As always, I asked for a sign that I had been heard.
Cape Lookout State Park:
Driving along Highway 1, along the coast is a “must”. Everyone goes on about California but honestly I found Oregon even better.  Samuel H. Boardman Scenic Corridor has my vote over Big Sur any day. With parts of the coast resembling Maine’s rocky shoreline, other seaside villages which would rival Italy’s Amalfi coast with homes dramatically sticking to cliffs (i.e Oceanside), the purest soft-sand beaches with haystack rock formations and arches which go on for miles, you can walk all by yourself for miles at a time and not encounter anyone else.
The little village of Oceanside.

The little village of Oceanside.

Number 1: No pretentious attitudes. Number 2: Oregon lawmakers and environmentalist had the foresight to keep their beaches public for the use of all in perpetuity and prohibited any kind of development. Meaning, you have the most stunning, remote beaches and they are open to exploration by anyone with nary an ugly condo development on the beach itself anywhere. Number 3) Dogs are allowed on the beaches and everyone picks up after them. Some towns have unfortunately become tourist traps like Seaside and Cannon Beach, but there are still amazing hidden gems there like Manzanita, Oceanside and Yachats.
Add to that, the mystical fog which seems to shroud everything in the early morning hours, coming in off the sea and hitting the coastal mountains and cliffs, families out on the beach investigating what the night tide brought into the tide pools like jelly fish, crabs and razor clams and just the sense of space the whole place gives you.
Trail heading out to the beach at Cape Lookout State Park

Trail heading out to the beach at Cape Lookout State Park

I came here to camp and after setting my tent up decided to walk along the long beach. I was blessed to hit it on an exceptionally bright sunny, cloudless but windy day. The water was an aquamarine blue and the sound of the thunderous waves would rejuvenate even most tired of souls. I eventually found a lonely spot, away from the families and dogs I could just sink into, lean against a piece of driftwood, read a book, take in the salty air and just take it easy. I was less than 50 meters away from the water when about 100 meters away from me, I suddenly saw a giant dark, black-grey dorsal fin pop out of the water.
I of course thought it was a shark but then a spout of water shot up through the air. Then a second, a third, fourth, fifth and sixth. It was a pod of whales sunning and feeding themselves. I spent the rest of that afternoon hanging out with them, silently communicating with them for hours until sunset, when one by one, I did not see any more water spouting every few seconds and they swam off.
In Native lore, when you have an unexpected animal encounter, it means you are being gifted with a certain medicine, that a certain animal totem-animal spirit is bringing you a message from the Spirit world. In my case I understood that whatever I had petitioned for back on Neahkahnie Mountain had been heard and second, I had been gifted with Whale Medicine.
The lesson here is: don’t ever pay any attention to what New Agers, channellers, UFO enthusiasts and the like tell you about what place is “powerful” and what isn’t. Always pay close attention to the old stories and myths of the original, indigenous people of any given area since they know that landmass better than anyone else because of their history in the area. I mean: First Nations tribes in the Americas, Aboriginals in Australia, Dravidian/Tamil Indians in India, the Ainu in Japan, Celts in Ireland and the old Druidic orders in Great Britain etc. There are still many magical places left on Earth, but you have to look for them and no stupid New Age huckster will ever tell you where they are. Never  forget that the natural world has all the answers we need. We just need to train ourselves to ask the right questions and understand that language better.
Categories: Ascension, Ch-ch-ch-changes, New Energy Centers, Raise your EQ, Those unseen things, Travels | Tags: , , , | 10 Comments

Those Healing Places and Spaces

A typical scene in Vermont.

A typical scene in Vermont.

I seriously love Vermont.

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Not only is it a mere 60 minute car ride from Montreal, (a fact which seems to freak out some of my geographically challenged American friends who seem to think Canada is some distant far-away place closer to the North Pole. Newsflash: Burlington, Vermont is a 90 minute drive away from Montreal, Boston and NYC are about 5 hours of driving away from Montreal, Vancouver is less than 2 hours away from Seattle and Windsor is literally over the bridge from Detroit.) but Vermont is one of the most independent and progressive states within the union, with strict environmental laws, which are the envy of most of the industrialized West and a political movement within the state which is pushing to jail George W. Bush and  Dick Cheney (and rightly so I think…). Vermont was one of the last states to join the union and if there ever is another civil war in that country, will probably be one of the first states to leave as well, I suspect. It regularly produces very independently minded politicians like Jim Jeffords and Bernie Sanders, who until a few years ago was the only sitting socialist in the House of Representatives. Anarchist theorist Murray Bookchin lived there for many years as well.

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It’s known as the Green Mountain State, in reference to the fact that the Appalachians roll through the entire state, with meandering rivers cutting through bucolic verdant, green valleys in the summer. Autumn here means that the hills are literally alive with color.

A typical Vermont farm scene.

A typical Vermont farm scene.

Three Nobel prize winners of literature, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Sinclair Lewis and Rudyard Kipling have all lived, at one point or another in the tiny town of Brattleboro. “Catcher in the Rye” author J.D Salinger lived as a recluse for many years here as well. With family farms sitting beside tiny New England villages, it’s easy to see why artists, writers and other creative types come here in droves to just be left alone, think and be inspired.

Naulakha, the old Kipling house in Brattleboro.

Naulakha, the old Kipling house in Brattleboro.

It’s the kind of place where if you need to decompress or get your bearings, you can and not be worried about distractions of any sort. Not surprisingly, it is a place, like Hawaii, that New World Order-types have also targeted to ruin. The latest attempt is the new air force base near Burlington which often has eardrum-exploding F-35 fighter jets screaming across the sky practically every hour.

Water springs at the House of the Virgin Mary, Ephesus, Turkey

Water springs at the House of the Virgin Mary, Ephesus, Turkey

People the world over have always expressed certain springs or certain geographical land features as “healing”. Catholics have places like Lourdes, Fatima or even the House of the Virgin Mary at Ephesus, and swear that the waters from the springs there have healing properties. The Incas had the Urubamba River in Peru, far below Machu Picchu. The Irish have hundreds of holy wells dotting their countryside, each one attributed to some saint or other. Every religion and/or faith tradition has its own spot or place of healing power. I went to the House of the Virgin Mary and had the water there. I also fell into the Urubamba River while rafting. Nothing special happened to me physically at all at either of those places, unfortunately.

Many of the holy wells in the Celtic world predate Christianity by thousands of years and were places of worship in pagan times. Introduce Christianity + rename the place = Voila, a new holy well!

Many of the holy wells in the Celtic world predate Christianity by thousands of years and were places of worship in pagan times. Introduce Christianity + rename the place = Voila, a new holy well!

Native and First Nations people however have a different take on healing spots. When I visited Mount Shasta, California in 2005, I spent time with the spiritual leader of the tribe who are the real guardians of that mountain, the Winnemem Wintu. Unfortunately  they are a tribe who are not nationally recognized and not on the register for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Nonetheless, I was lucky enough to spend time with Caleen Sisk-Franco their leader, and her family during their annual Coonrod Ceremony in August, to honor the salmon. The meeting also meant smudging everyone before they jumped into the lower McCloud River Falls. A member of Caleen’s family described it to me in this way: “We consider a site or place holy mostly if there is something unusual about a place, geographically. See these falls, how it is almost perfectly round, like an arena or amphitheater? To us, that means something. It means Spirit has been at work here in a special way”.

members of the winnemem Wintu jumping into the lower McCloud River falls during the Coonrod ceremony.

Members of the Winnemem Wintu jumping into the lower McCloud River falls during the Coonrod ceremony.

I have this “thing” about swimming in natural settings, preferably in rushing streams, gorges, rivers or the ocean. Negative ions in the air which comes from the water’s constant movement and splashing or churning probably has something to do with it. It just makes you feel better.

One of my favorite swimming holes, Les Cascades Rawdon, where the Oureau river changes elevation dramatically through a  series of rock ledges and rock pools.

One of my favorite swimming holes, Les Cascades Rawdon, where the Oureau river changes elevation dramatically through a series of rock ledges and rock pools.

I’m literally the type to carry my bathing suit with me when I go hiking, just in case I come across the perfect spot to jump into, to cool off in. That would explain why I hate swimming pools, artificial beaches and why I find lakes revolting (especially when you walk into a patch of “warm” water and there’s tons of little kids everywhere…). I found this excellent site which lists natural swimming holes all over the US and decided since I was going to be in Vermont for a few days, I was going to explore some of the places listed, particularly around Stowe. I decided to visit and explore Bingham Falls, Sterling Falls Gorge and Moss Glen Falls.

The last thing I had on my mind was healing as I hiked through the woods and clambered down the wet rocks and boulders and made my way towards Bingham Falls. It’s at least a 400 feet drop along one side of a hill, on round boulders, and requires your complete attention lest you slip on these wet rocks on your way down. (Do NOT do this with flip-flops). I was too busy enjoying the beauty of the place, the fresh mountain and forest air, hearing the roar of the water as it rushed through rock pools and small gorges. When I finally got to the bottom and saw the falls and watched boys jump from the top of the falls into the pool below, all I could really do was take in the wonder of the place and realize that these are the hidden places of the world, the real places, where I’m sure the little folk meet on full moon nights, far from the gaze of humans, far from the gaze of civilization. This is where real magic takes place. I just felt happy to be there. I offered some tobacco to the place, in gratitude.

Vermont also has a strong tradition of skinney-dipping but I think  Bingham Falls is way too well-known a spot for that sort of thing.

Vermont also has a strong tradition of skinny-dipping but I think Bingham Falls is way too well-known a spot for that sort of thing.

I took my time and went swimming in the pool, clambered over rocks, investigated pools downstream and watched how the water formed a gorge upstream. Talked to people there, some were Hell’s Angels bikers but if you leave them alone, they leave you alone. Most were teens on holiday with their parents from places like New Jersey or Maryland (Stowe valley is a bit of a resort area). Finally it was time to leave and I was not looking forward to climbing up those 400 feet back to the main trail. Mostly because I have always had some inflexibility in my left hip and no matter how much yoga or massage therapy I do, it never gets better. (I made the mistake of taking the stairs up to Machu Picchu and what normally takes most people 45 minutes to do, took me 90 minutes, to give you an idea).

Stairs to Machu Picchu. Never again.

Stairs to Machu Picchu. Never again.

I made the slow climb up the boulders, pacing myself mostly because I didn’t want to get all hot and sweaty again especially after such a refreshing swim, I walked slowly along the uphill trail back to the road and then made it back to my tent. That’s when I realized that there was no pain at all in my hip. In fact, ever since Bingham Falls, I have not felt any pain at all in that hip even after exploring steeper places.

The pain is gone.

Categories: New Energy Centers, Raise your EQ, Those unseen things, Travels, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

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